Porsche Cayman GT4 RS spied – 718 to receive Rennsport treatment

The standard 718 Cayman GT4 has only been with us since July, but we’ve already spotted a hardcore variant testing at the Nürburgring during Industry Pool. The model will likely adopt the ‘RS’ moniker – a first for the Cayman range – boosting aero, power and reducing weight.

We’re rather fond of the Porsche Cayman GT4 in standard form, with a handful of components from the glorious 911 GT3, a 4-litre naturally aspirated flat-six and a manual gearbox to go with it. Of course, this clearly wasn’t enough, and so Stuttgart’s boffins have set to work on a harder variant…

> New 2019 Porsche Cayman GT4 review – it’s a bit special

At the front, we can see that Porsche has fitted a new carbonfibre GT3 RS Weissach-style bonnet, complete with NACA ducts for increased brake cooling. Behind the B-pillar, on both driver and passenger sides, sit a set of louvers, presumably to provide the NA six with more air.

Most notable is the new rear wing, sporting more height and rake than on the standard GT4. The unit seen on the test car is also hung in the swan neck manner, and has much larger end plates, though as this is a prototype, it’s possible that these features won’t make it to production.

In standard 718 GT4 form, the 992-derived flat-six produces 414bhp and boasts an 8000rpm red line, but of course, these figures won’t stay untouched. As it’s a naturally aspirated unit, we don’t expect to see drastic increases, but a figure in the region of 440bhp wouldn’t be out of the question. The real question is how that power will get to the ground…

Though the GT4 is currently offered exclusively in manual form, a PDK option is on the horizon, and with the PDK-only 992 911 already on the market, perhaps an increase in power will see Porsche drop the manual from the GT4 altogether. Should both be available, we’ll receive six-speed manual and seven-speed PDK transmissions.

Elsewhere, the diffuser and exhaust system appear to be untouched. However, we’d be surprised if Porsche didn’t offer an optional sports exhaust system. The same 20-inch wheels and GT3-derived brakes as on the standard car can be seen on this prototype, and although wheel diameter is unlikely to see an increase, a lighter option may be on the table. PCCBs will be an option as before.

Based on the £40,000 premium the GT3 RS carries over the GT3, we’d expect a hardcore GT4 to sit at around the £100,000 mark. As for a reveal date, don’t expect to see much before the end of the year.

Wiesmann teases all-new V8 supercar ahead of 2020 reveal

Small-scale German sports car manufacturer Wiesmann has teased its first new model in almost a decade. Codenamed Project Gecko, after the brand’s logo, we’ll get our first look at it at some point in 2020.

Wiesmann says the new model will be an evolution of the MF5, a model that made its debut at 2008’s Geneva motor show. Featuring BMW ’s glorious 5-litre V10 from the E60 M5, it produced a very healthy 500bhp for a 3.9sec 0-62mph time and 193mph top speed – respectable numbers even today.

> Wiesmann GT MF5

The marque’s latest effort will continue its long-standing partnership with BMW, this time using a 4.4-litre twin-turbocharged V8. Assuming this is in reference to the unit found in the G90 M5, Project Gecko could boast almost 600bhp, and given its sub-1380kg kerb weight, that should result in some rather impressive performance numbers indeed.

Advertisement – Article continues below

The lack of weight in the preceding MF5 gave it a 0.8sec 0-62mph advantage over the M5 it was based on, so given the use of modern lightweight construction methods and a significant bump in power, we can expect a sub-3.0sec 0-62mph time and a top speed in excess of 200mph. It might not come with the NA V10’s whaling 8500rpm red line, but it’ll certainly perform…

As with all of Wiesmann’s products, Project Gecko will focus on driver engagement, with lightweight construction, a front mid-engined, RWD layout and perfect 50:50 weight distribution all helping to achieve this.

Wiesmann’s chief executive, Roheen Berry, said: ‘This last true independent manufacturer of German sports cars is back and has an exciting future to look forward to. When we set out on this journey we said we wanted to re-engineer an icon and we are on track to do exactly that.’

Production at its Dülmen, Germany factory will begin next year, and although pricing is yet to be announced, the waiting list is already open. Expect further details to surface in the coming months.

2020 Jaguar F-Pace spied testing – SUV to receive tech overhaul

It’s been three years since the Jaguar F-Pace came to fruition, so it’s no surprise that the British marque is looking to bring it up to speed with the rest of its range for the 2020 model year. Our spy photographers have spotted a (heavily) camouflaged version testing in southern Europe ahead of its reveal.

Don’t be fooled by the heavy camo’, as this mid-cycle update is unlikely to offer any dramatic changes to styling, instead focusing on bringing the model’s technology in line with the rest of the range. Sharper head and tail light optics are to be expected, and both front and rear bumpers will see light alteration too. A new intake and grille design at the front is likely to make an appearance, and at the rear, a new diffuser complete with tweaked exhausts.

> 2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR review – SVO upgrades combine to create Macan Turbo rival

Though details are predictably patchy at this stage, rumours suggest that we’ll see most of the changes inside, where it’ll adopt the more advanced PIVI Pro infotainment system alongside other tech features you’ll find in JLR’s more recent products. A sticking point of the current F-Pace is its unresponsive, confusing infotainment system, so an upgrade in that department will be a welcome addition. Although not shown in our images, our photographers noted the presence of heavy disguise in the cabin, further confirming the likelihood of significant interior changes.

2020 Jaguar F-Pace spied testing – SUV to receive tech overhaul | Evo

Volkswagen ID.3 R considered – the next-generation Golf R

The ID.3 is the most important car Volkswagen has unveiled in a long time, marking the beginning of its ID electric vehicle offensive and shaping its model line-up for decades to come. This aside, it’s not a particularly evo car in current form, so when can we expect a little more from the brand’s first standalone EV? Our sister title Auto Express caught up with top bosses to discuss.

In top specification, the standard ID.3 produces 201bhp from a single rear-mounted motor, enough to feel brisk whilst you’re popping to the shops, but certainly no match for the performance we’re accustomed to finding in an R product.

> 2020 Volkswagen ID.3 revealed – VW’s electric revolution is here

In keeping with the Volkswagen R tradition, we’d expect to see the use of a front motor on a hot variant, making it all-wheel drive for improved acceleration. Of course, larger brakes, wheels, lower, stiffer suspension and more aggressive bodywork would also likely make an appearance. Through software tweaks similar to Track mode in the Tesla Model 3 Performance, EV powertrains can also be tuned to better handle spirited driving, allowing more slip, better acceleration and improved throttle response at the touch of a button.

In order to extract as much range as possible, efficiency is high on the agenda for EVs, meaning performance often takes a back burner. Volkswagen e-mobility product marketing specialist, Christine Leuderalbert, spoke about the difficulty of balancing the two attributes: ‘We’re actively considering it, but we need to do some work on how an electric car can also be a performance car. We know electric vehicles have excellent acceleration, but we need to look at how the rest of the package would affect the car’s efficiency.’

Despite the concerns, VW’s member of the board of management for sales and marketing, Jürgen Stackmann, added: ‘If there is a future for R, it must be electric. It’s very simple. We need to define what is R in the electric world; it’s different to what we know of in a Golf or any other car.’ He also said: ‘First will come plug-in hybrid, which is already coming with Touareg. That’s something where we have the answer. For the rest we need to find smart, sustainable answers. The plan is filled with great R models going forward but you have to accept that after this, you just can’t plough on. You’d look at us and ask what we are doing here. We have to find good answers for that and that work is happening now.’

As for when we might see an all-electric R model, Stackmann said: ‘We should be able to deliver something meaningful in under five years. But it’s turf without a lot of expertise for us, at the moment, so we have to start that journey.’

Volkswagen ID.3 R considered – the next-generation Golf R | Evo

#blog – MarsEdit/draft#