First foldable phones predicted to hit market this year, ahead of Apple’s rumored plans

First foldable phones predicted to hit market this year, ahead of Apple’s rumored plans:

Tech commentators are predicting that the first smartphones with foldable displays will hit the market by the end of the year.

Samsung, Huawei, LG, Oppo, Lenovo and ZTE all have patents relating to foldable phones, in addition to Apple …

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(Via 9to5Mac)

Apple WWDC2018 high resolution wallpapers – Martin Hajek

Apple officially announced WWDC 2018 for June 4th through June 8th this week, with the conference taking place at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California.

As is the case every year, Apple used some pretty neat graphics to announce the conference. Now, designer Martin Hajek has created a set of 16 wallpapers inspired by the WWDC artwork…

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Apple WWDC2018 high resolution wallpapers – Martin Hajek:

(Via www.martinhajek.com)

New Apple patent application hints at long-range wireless charging

New Apple patent application hints at long-range wireless charging:

A new patent application by Apple hints at RF-based long-range wireless charging, along the lines of the Energous system recently granted FCC approval.

As is usual with Apple patent applications, the wording is as general as possible – encompassing both wired and wireless charging – but the problem it aims to solve does appear to be one that arises primarily with long-range wireless charging …

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(Via 9to5Mac)

iFixit matches Apple’s $29 battery swap cost, covers pre-iPhone 6 devices

iFixit matches Apple’s $29 battery swap cost, covers pre-iPhone 6 devices:

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Looking to equal or beat Apple in the aftermath of its iPhone battery apology, iFixit has dropped the price of its do-it-yourself battery swap kits to $29 or less. More significantly this includes kits for the iPhone 4S, 5, 5s, and 5c, which are excluded from Apple’s discounted battery replacements.

(Via AppleInsider – Frontpage News)

The Best HomeKit-Compatible Smart-Home Devices

The Best HomeKit-Compatible Smart-Home Devices:

The Best HomeKit-Compatible Smart-Home Devices

Apple’s HomeKit is a user-friendly platform for anyone who owns an iOS device and is interested in a simple, reliable DIY smart-home system. With a couple of HomeKit-compatible devices and a recent iPhone or iPad, it’s realistic to start from scratch and have an integrated system up and running in a few minutes. Apple doesn’t yet offer a voice-controlled speaker like the Google Home or Amazon Echo (the HomePod should be available in early 2018), but you can control your HomeKit system via the Siri voice assistant built into Apple phones, tablets, computers, and watches, or through smartphone and tablet apps.

(Via Wirecutter: Reviews for the Real World)

Apple might combine iOS and Mac apps next year

Apple might combine iOS and Mac apps next year:

Apple might start to converge iOS and macOS in a big way next year by letting developers create a single app that runs across both platforms. Bloomberg reports that Apple is planning to let developers create apps that will adjust to whichever platform they’re running on, so that they’ll support touch input on an iPhone or an iPad and mouse and trackpad input on a Mac.

The report notes that plans could always change, but it sounds like the combined apps could become available next year. If so, they’d likely be announced in June at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference and then introduced in the fall, when new versions of iOS and macOS typically ship.

Though Apple is far from the first to attempt such a crossover, the move would still be a very big deal. While the Mac has its share of very good apps, iOS is by far the more vibrant ecosystem. By letting developers create for two platforms at once, Apple can potentially make it easier and faster for updates and new apps to arrive on the Mac.

The really big open question is how all of this will work. It isn’t clear whether this means that macOS will emulate portions of iOS, or if developers will still largely have to code two separate apps. The closer the two platforms are, the easier it’ll be for developers — but the bigger the risk of users on one platform getting an interface that feels like it was designed for other types of input.

Microsoft has been trying this exact same thing with Universal Windows Platform apps for a while now, allowing developers to create apps that run across Windows, Windows phones, the Xbox, HoloLens, and even the Surface Hub. This has had limited success, in part because there’s always going to be one or more platforms that developers just don’t care to serve. Google has started going down the same road, bringing Android apps over to Chrome OS.

(Via The Verge – All Posts)