Rules of engagement: why we’re still working on making people happy at work

Rules of engagement: why we’re still working on making people happy at work:

Back in the day, the motivational theories of Abraham Maslow and Frederick Herzberg were considered de rigeur.  They’re founded on the idea that people have basic needs, and that job satisfaction depends on whether those needs are met (or not).  It’s perception of this that influences an individual’s sense of motivation and engagement at work.

(Via City & Guilds Kineo Blog)

US Beef and Kineo win gold at the Brandon Hall awards

US Beef and Kineo win gold at the Brandon Hall awards:

Brandon Hall Group has recognized Kineo’s work with United States Beef Corporation (US Beef) in the category of best blended learning. Kineo is thrilled to take home gold in this category of the HCM Excellence Awards.

The Brandon Hall Group Excellence Awards are highly sought after and are one of the most prestigious awards in the industry. The awards require demonstrated and measurable benefits to the business as a whole, a unique distinction highlighting that winning solutions are transforming the business.

(Via City & Guilds Kineo Blog)

Grey market Nikon D500 for $1,799, new refurbished deals

Nikon-D500-grey-market-camera-deal

Grey market Nikon D500 cameras are now selling for $1,799 on eBay (regular price: $1,996,95).

There are also few new refurbished deals on Nikon gear:

Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8G lens: $1,299 (savings: $500.95/28%)

Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8G VR II: $1,699.95 (savings: $419.05/20%)

Nikon 55-300mm f/4.5-5.6G lens: $199.95 (savings: $100/33%)

Nikon 50mm f/1.8G lens: $159.95 (savings: $57/26%)

Nikon 50mm f/1.4G lens: $359.95 (savings: $40/10%)

Nikon 16-35 f/4G lens: $899.95 (savings: $150/14%)

Nikon D7100 + WU-1A wireless adapter: $589.95 (savings: $310/34%)

Nikon D7200 + 55-200mm lens + WU-1A wireless adapter: $849.95

Nikon D810: $2,279 (savings: $716/24%)

Nikon D750: $1,749.95 (savings: $250)

A Super-Quick Markup Primer

As discussed in “First Steps”, Ulysses uses special characters around text passages to let you define the meaning of these passages. This is called “markup”, and each distinct character set, such as underscores for emphasis, is called a “markup definition”. Any collection of definitions is then called a “markup language”. There are many markup languages in the wild, and you may have come across one or the other on message boards or blogging platforms: Textile, Setext, or the increasingly popular Markdown by John Gruber.

By default, Ulysses uses its native markup language, dubbed “Markdown XL”.